Diversity on the Shelf

Would you like to add a challenge to your reading life? There are a few reading challenges going on this year that highlight diverse lit. I have joined two that will help add more diversity to my year.

My Little Pocketbooks
Diversity on the Shelf is being hosted by Alysia at My Little Pocketbooks. She has provided an excellent list of resources for finding diverse lit and will be having link-ups throughout the year. She has a giveaway going on right now too. I have already started working on this challenge by reading Death, Dickinson, and the Demented Life of Frenchie Garcia by Jenny Torres, Amazing Peace: A Christmas Poem by Maya Angelou and Inheritance by Malinda Lo in addition to some children’s lit. I have started a Goodreads shelf and here you can also see any books shelved with the tag Diversity on the Shelf 2014 by other challenge participants.
latin@s

Another fun challenge is being hosted by Latin@s in Kid Lit. They are encouraging people to read children’s and young adult literature by or about Latin@s. They also provide resource lists and suggestions. There will be link-ups here also.

 

When I started making my plan for what I would be reading this year, one of the lists I checked was the Best Multicultural Books of 2013 to see what I may have missed last year. The list was created by the Center for the Study of Multicultural Children’s Literature.

 

Whether you join a formal reading challenge or not, I hope that this year you will be reading and supporting diverse young adult literature in any way that you are able. I wish you a fantastic year of reading!

4 New Releases This Week

There are four books hitting shelves this week that you should check out!

diamondsDiamonds and Deceit by Leila Rasheed

London is a whirl of balls and teas, alliances and rivalries. Rose has never felt more out of place. With the Season in full swing, she can’t help but still feel a servant dressed up in diamonds and silk. Then Rose meets Alexander Ross, a young Scottish duke. Rose has heard the rumors about Ross’s sordid past just like everyone else has. Yet he alone treats her as a friend. Rose knows better than to give her heart to an aristocrat with such a reputation, but it may be too late.

Ada should be happy. She is engaged to a handsome man who shares her political passions and has promised to support her education. So why does she feel hollow inside? Even if she hated Lord Fintan, she would have no choice but to go through with the marriage. Every day a new credit collector knocks on the door of their London flat, demanding payment for her cousin William’s expenditures. Her father’s heir seems determined to bring her family to ruin, and only a brilliant marriage can save Somerton Court and the Averleys’ reputation.

Meanwhile, at Somerton, Sebastian is out of his mind with worry for his former valet Oliver, who refuses to plead innocent to the murder charges against him–for a death caused by Sebastian himself. Sebastian will do whatever he can to help the boy he loves, but his indiscretion is dangerous fodder for a reporter with sharp eyes and dishonorable intentions.

The colorful cast of the At Somerton series returns in this enthralling sequel about class and fortune, trust and betrayal, love and revenge. — Cover image and summary via Goodreads

Gold Medal WinterGold Medal Winter By Donna Freitas

Esperanza Flores’s place on the United States Olympic figure skating team has come at the expense of an injured skater, so in addition to the pressure of sudden fame and outsized expectations Espi has to deal with the resentment of her teammates–and their efforts to sabotage her routine.

(Image and summary via Goodreads)

greatestWhen I Was the Greatest by Jason Reynolds

In Bed Stuy, New York, a small misunderstanding can escalate into having a price on your head–even if you’re totally clean. This gritty, triumphant debut captures the heart and the hardship of life for an urban teen.

“A lot of the stuff that gives my neighborhood a bad name, I don’t really mess with. The guns and drugs and all that, not really my thing.” Nah, not his thing. Ali’s got enough going on, between school and boxing and helping out at home. His best friend Noodles, though. Now there’s a dude looking for trouble–and, somehow, it’s always Ali around to pick up the pieces. But, hey, a guy’s gotta look out for his boys, right? Besides, it’s all small potatoes; it’s not like anyone’s getting hurt.

And then there’s Needles. Needles is Noodles’s brother. He’s got a syndrome, and gets these ticks and blurts out the wildest, craziest things. It’s cool, though: everyone on their street knows he doesn’t mean anything by it.

Yeah, it’s cool…until Ali and Noodles and Needles find themselves somewhere they never expected to be…somewhere they never should’ve been–where the people aren’t so friendly, and even less forgiving. — Cover image and summary via IndieBound

More than good enoughMore Than Good Enough by Crissa-Jean Chappell

Trent Osceola’s life is turned upside down when his mother announces that he will be moving to the Miccosukee reservation to live with his father, who was recently released from prison. Only half Miccosukee, Trent feels alienated from rez society and starts to question who he really is. When he changes schools, he reconnects with Pippa, a childhood friend who moved away, and together they tackle the class assignment to make a film of their lives. When he starts to see himself through Pippa’s eyes, Trent’s not sure he likes what he sees. Will he ever be good enough for the rez, for school, and for her?

(Image and summary via NetGalley)

End of the Year Giveaway and Hiatus

With the end of the year in sight, it’s time for us to take a brief break at Rich in Color. While we won’t be updating our main site with new posts, you may spot us from time to time on Tumblr or Twitter. We will be back to our regular posting schedule on Monday, January 6th.

In the meantime, let’s have a giveaway, shall we? This giveaway is open to people with U.S. mailing addresses only.

12/29/2013 UPDATE
We have nine eleven books up for grabs: Killer of Enemies by Joseph Bruchac (ARC); Charm & Strange by Stephanie Kuehn; Shadows on the Moon by Zoe Marriott; Sorrow’s Knot by Erin Bow; Team Human by Justine Larbalestier and Sarah Rees Brennan; Diverse Energies edited by Tobias S. Buckell & Joe Monti; Death, Dickinson, and the Demented Life of Frenchie Garcia by Jenny Torres Sanchez; Prophecy by Ellen Oh (ARC); Prophecy by Ellen Oh (paperback); Warrior by Ellen Oh (hardcover); and The Living by Matt de le Pena. In addition, two people will win a YA book of their choice that was written by or stars a person of color.

Many thanks to Ellen Oh for donating the paperback copy of Prophecy and the hardcover copy of Warrior to our giveaway!

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We’ll see you in 2014!

Favorite Diverse YA from 2013

Narrowing down my favorites for the year was pretty tough. There are so many that I don’t want to leave out. I finally narrowed it down though.

Dystopian

proxy

 

Proxy by Alex London was a fast paced novel that kept me flipping the pages both times I read it. And yes, I did read it twice already. I reviewed it here

prodigy

 

Marie Lu’s Legend series got even more amazing with Prodigy. June and Day are compelling characters and I can’t wait to see what happens next.

unravel

 

Juliette from Unravel Me is another character that fascinates me. Tehereh Mafi is weaving a tale that has completely sucked me in and I’m excited for the next installment.

Contemporary Books

Rogue_JKT_FINAL
Rogue author Lyn Miller-Lachmann visited out blog earlier this year and shared a bit about her writing. After learning about the book, I knew I wanted to read it. This is on the younger side of YA with the main character in middle school. I loved that readers see into the world of a person with Asperger’s syndrome, but Kiara is much more than that. She is an X-Men enthusiast, a loyal friend, a movie maker and much more. Kiara is a character that I wished I could meet in person.

yaqui


In Yaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass, Piddy Sanchez is bullied. This is a gritty book that tugged at my heart. Fortunately, Piddy has some amazing people in her life. This book brought me to tears, but also brought laughter and smiles. Author Meg Medina was kind enough to grant us an interview and Jessica also reviewed Yaqui on Rich in Color back in May.

 

Historical

eleanor and parkEleanor and Park takes place in the 80s so those headphones are leading to a Walkman not an iPod, thus the historical label. It also earns a romance label. The relationship between Eleanor and Park was simply sweet in contrast to some of the rather horrible things in Eleanor’s life.

If I ever get out of here

 

 

If I Ever Get Out of Here was another fabulous book set in the past – specifically the 70s. I reviewed it on my personal blog here, and we also held a group discussion (with spoilers) earlier this month. Gansworth manages to handle some serious issues like bullying and poverty with a nice balance of humor. Lewis, the main character, is a teenager from the Tuscarora Indian reservation and he is attending a mostly white high school. Watching as Lewis navigates the social life of that school is both humorous and heart-breaking. 

Poetry – Historical

dreamer

 

The Lightning Dreamer is based on the life of Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda (1814-1873). She was a feminist and abolitionist. Margarita Engle used this novel-in-verse to express some of Avellaneda’s ideas.

Here is a sample:
Beyond these convent gates, books
are locked away
and men
hold
the keys.

 

Graphic Novels – Historical


Screen shot 2013-12-17 at 9.39.08 PMBoxers and Saints is actually two books, but they should be read together. They are both telling the same story during the Boxer Rebellion in China, but from two different perspectives. The first time I read them, I was impressed, but on a second read through, they were even better. I reviewed them here. They are a set of books that should not be missed even if graphic novels are not something you typically read.

Comedy

Asked

Since You Asked was a bunch of fun. I reviewed it here. In it, Holly Kim writes a column in her high school newspaper. She is a bit snarky and has the goal of shaking things up around school. I loved her interactions with her mother and she also has a great group of friends. This one is sure to have you laughing.

Have you read any fantastic books that I might have missed? What were some of your favorites this year? Please share in the comments.

My Favs of 2013

When I first decided to write my year in review, I thought it would be easy to write a post on the books I read this year. But then came time to sit down and write and my mind went blank. I had a hard time trying to even remember most of the books I read this year, especially ones that were published in 2013. Next year, I’m making a list and checking it twice. In the end, I was able to come up with a small list, plus a few books I’m looking forward to in 2014.

 
eleanor and parkOverall Favorite Book of 2013
Eleanor & Park, by Rainbow Rowell

OMG, I loved this book! The minute I started reading it, I had a smile on my face all the way through. Okay, not all the way as the story takes a darker turn, but I was still rooting for Eleanor and Park because I loved both the characters and I loved their relationship. Rainbow Rowell tells their love story in such a sweet and realistic way that you fall in love with both of them as they fall in love. Another aspect of the novel, for me, was the nostalgia factor as the story was set in 1986, so a number of cultural references I could relate to. Even thinking about this book gives me a warm fuzzy feeling and I know this will be a book I will read again and again.

 
Favorite SciFi/Fantasy Book of 2013
Immortal Rules/The Eternity Cure, by Julie Kagawa

julie-kagawa-immortal-rules-eternity-cure-book-covers-2

I know that Eternity Cure actually came out this year, but in order for me to write my review (link here) I had to read Immortal Rules, so I’m placing both books as my favorite for this year. This series is just so intense and it makes vampires scary again, not mopey teenagers in love. I completely lost myself in the world that Julie Kagawa created and fell in love with Allison and Zeke. The Blood of Eden series will be one I’m sure I’ll read again and again. Plus, after the cliffhanger that Kagawa left us on, I’m eagerly anticipating the next book, which is titled “The Forever Song” and publishes in April.

 

 

via Goodreads

via Goodreads

My “Diversity Done Right” Award
House of Hades, by Rick Riordan

I only started reading the Heroes of Olympus series at the request of my students and ended up enjoying the series. While my students were over the moon excited for the 4th book, I was a bit ambivalent as I really didn’t like Mark of Athena all that much. I have to say that I was extremely pleased with House of Hades, the improvements by Riordan to handle the narrative of 7 points of view, as well as how he handled issues of diversity amongst the characters. He doesn’t shy away from it, but he also doesn’t make it a “afternoon school special” feel. He also made a beloved character gay, which shocked my students, but pleased me immensely because Riordan’s world now felt like the one we live in.

 Book I Can’t Wait For

courtesy of Goodreads

courtesy of Goodreads

Ignite Me, by Tahereh Mafi

If you haven’t read the “Shatter Me” series  you need to. It is such an intense series and beautifully written at the same time. Ignite Me is the last book of the series and I can’t wait to see how it’s going to end. Also, isn’t the cover just gorgeous?

Group Discussion of If I Ever Get Out of Here

If I ever get out of here

If I Ever Get Out of Here was a book that caught our attention at Rich in Color, so we decided we should do a group discussion for it. Read on to see what we thought about the book.

Lewis “Shoe” Blake is used to the joys and difficulties of life on the Tuscarora Indian reservation in 1975: the joking, the Fireball games, the snow blowing through his roof. What he’s not used to is white people being nice to him — people like George Haddonfield, whose family recently moved to town with the Air Force. As the boys connect through their mutual passion for music, especially the Beatles, Lewis has to lie more and more to hide the reality of his family’s poverty from George. He also has to deal with the vicious Evan Reininger, who makes Lewis the special target of his wrath. But when everyone else is on Evan’s side, how can he be defeated? And if George finds out the truth about Lewis’s home — will he still be his friend?

Acclaimed adult author Eric Gansworth makes his YA debut with this wry and powerful novel about friendship, memory, and the joy of rock ‘n’ roll.

WARNING: SPOILERS THROUGHOUT THE DISCUSSION

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