Black Girl Magic

One of the most anticipated debuts of 2017 is Angie Thomas’s “The Hate U Give”. At the center of the story is 16 year Starr, a young Black girl, who witnesses her friend fatally shot by a police officer. Word on the street is that Thoma’s debut novel is one that will break your heart and move you into action at the same time. Of course, we at Rich in Color are excited as well, so instead of just reading and reviewing the book, “The Hate U Give” will be our first discussion book of 2017! Read along with us when the novel comes out at the end of this month and then share your thoughts with us.

But before that, I thought I’d celebrate Thomas’s debut by sharing some of my favorite YA Black heroines (and for Black History Month).

1. Flora from The Game of Love and Death by Martha Brockenbrough
First off, Flora is a pilot! Who can’t love a Black heroine who is one of the few women flying planes in this Depression-era novel. Not only does Flora want to be like Amelia Earhart, she is a talented singer who works in her family’s night club. She loves her family fiercely and would do anything for them, much to the chagrin of the young man who wants her attention. While she is intrigued by her suitor, Flora has her priorities set and resists him because she is fully aware of the racism that she and her suitor would face as an inter-racial couple. Flora has tremendous agency in this novel and is not a passive participant in the romance once it begins to develop. In fact, her suitor ends up following her lead. Flora’s determination and drive to be unapologetic-ally herself in a time when Black women were facing so much oppression can show teens that they can be anything they put their heart into.

2. Natasha from The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon
One of the many great characteristics that Natasha has is that she is aware of her authentic self, which is often very unusual in a teenager which is why Natasha is so captivating. She is in a position where she knows the odds are against her but she decides to try to fight her deportation the best way she can. Even though she does experience moments of self doubt, she has a strong sense of who she is and decides to fight on because for her not trying something is failure. She is smart, witty, and funny, and like Flora, is not a passive participant in the romance. She doesn’t just react to her situation, but makes responsible decisions to actively change her situation. She doesn’t always get it right, but Natasha always tries and just that reason alone makes her an admirable character.

3. Lauren (Panda) from Endangered by Lamar Giles
I found Lauren/Panda to be a fun character with a lovely sarcastic attitude but also with a deeply caring heart. Panda’s initial reasons for why she exposes secrets come from a good place but really she ends up being just as bad as the people that hurt her initially. What makes Panda so special is that this is a character who becomes aware of this fault, reflects on it, then works hard to correct her mistake. Through her experience she also learns how to forgive and that forgiveness can set you free. I also love Panda because of the relationship she has with her parents. Like many teens, she keeps secrets from them, but when she realizes she truly needs the help of her parents, she has the integrity to come clean about her misdeeds knowing that she will face consequences. Panda is the type of teen that everyone can relate to because at some point, we’ve all been Panda.

4. Sierra Santiago from Shadowshaper by Daniel Jose Older
What I love best about Sierra is that she learns she has been dealt a raw deal by her family and instead of getting angry and raging at her family, she puts her energy into learning her magic and trying to solve the mystery. Sierra is a typical mono-myth hero whose life is turned upside down due to outside forces and must learn how to navigate in this new world she finds herself in. There are times when Sierra is frustrated and confused, but it is her love for her family, her friends, and her community that propels her to continue on her hero’s journey. Sierra is the mono-myth heroine we need because she finds her strength through her experiences and shows that Black girls can have amazing adventures and save the day.

5. Emily (Bird) from Love is the Drug by Alaya Dawn Johnson
Watching Bird change from sweet DC socialite to becoming woke is what makes her such a fascinating character. As Bird becomes more entrenched in solving the mystery, she also begins to become aware of the falseness of the people around her and becomes more confident in her Blackness. In turn, by becoming woke, she gains a stronger sense of self that actually scare some of the people around her, but she doesn’t care. That is what I loved best about her. Bird went from a girl needed everyone’s approval and acceptance to demanding that people accept her for who she is. For a teenager, to make that sort of demand is huge and empowering, which makes Bird a great fictional role model for all teens.

6. Genna from A Wish After Midnight & A Door at the Crossroads by Zetta Elliott
I am a huge fan of character transformations and Genna’s transformation from a girl who tries to hide her true self to one where she takes control of her life is a beautiful one. At the beginning, Genna seems almost mystified to find herself with a boyfriend, but with their separation and the need to survive in 1863, a completely different world of her own, Genna learns that she is much stronger than she ever realized, she just needed the opportunity. The Genna at the end of the book is a completely different Genna from the beginning. The Genna at the end of the novel is one who is willing to take risks, to fight for her family and friends, and willing to stand up for herself. I found myself truly rooting for Genna to succeed, especially in the sequel where she has now realized her true power and decides to use it. Genna is the heroine we all root for and want in our corner.

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K. Imani’s Favs of 2016

Usually each year I keep a list of all the books I read, but this year I got lazy therefore had to really think about which books I absolutely loved this year. Basically the deciding factor came down to books I want everyone to read, but wouldn’t let anyone borrow my copy (yeah, I’m that selfish, lol).

Yoon_9780553496680_jkt_all_r1.inddThe Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon (My Review)

Natasha: I’m a girl who believes in science and facts. Not fate. Not destiny. Or dreams that will never come true. I’m definitely not the kind of girl who meets a cute boy on a crowded New York City street and falls in love with him. Not when my family is twelve hours away from being deported to Jamaica. Falling in love with him won’t be my story.

Daniel: I’ve always been the good son, the good student, living up to my parents’ high expectations. Never the poet. Or the dreamer. But when I see her, I forget about all that. Something about Natasha makes me think that fate has something much more extraordinary in store—for both of us.

The Universe: Every moment in our lives has brought us to this single moment. A million futures lie before us. Which one will come true?

 

This Is Where It EndsThis is Where It Ends by Marieke Nijkamp (My Review)

10:00 a.m. The principal of Opportunity High School finishes her speech, welcoming the entire student body to a new semester and encouraging them to excel and achieve.

10:02 a.m. The students get up to leave the auditorium for their next class.

10:03 a.m. The auditorium doors won’t open.

10:05 a.m. Someone starts shooting.

Told from four different perspectives over the span of fifty-four harrowing minutes, terror reigns as one student’s calculated revenge turns into the ultimate game of survival.

 

evereywhereThe Girl From Everywhere by Heidi Heilig (Jessica’s Review)

Nix has spent her entire life aboard her father’s ship, sailing across the centuries, across the world, across myth and imagination.

As long as her father has a map for it, he can sail to any time, any place, real or imagined: nineteenth-century China, the land from One Thousand and One Nights, a mythic version of Africa. Along the way they have found crewmates and friends, and even a disarming thief who could come to mean much more to Nix.

But the end to it all looms closer every day.

Her father is obsessed with obtaining the one map, 1868 Honolulu, that could take him back to his lost love, Nix’s mother. Even though getting it—and going there—could erase Nix’s very existence.

For the first time, Nix is entering unknown waters.

She could find herself, find her family, find her own fantastical ability, her own epic love.

Or she could disappear.

 

Star Touched QueenThe Star Touched Queen by Roshani Chockshi (Read an excerpt here)

Fate and fortune. Power and passion. What does it take to be the queen of a kingdom when you’re only seventeen?

Maya is cursed. With a horoscope that promises a marriage of death and destruction, she has earned only the scorn and fear of her father’s kingdom. Content to follow more scholarly pursuits, her whole world is torn apart when her father, the Raja, arranges a wedding of political convenience to quell outside rebellions. Soon Maya becomes the queen of Akaran and wife of Amar. Neither roles are what she expected: As Akaran’s queen, she finds her voice and power. As Amar’s wife, she finds something else entirely: Compassion. Protection. Desire…

But Akaran has its own secrets—thousands of locked doors, gardens of glass, and a tree that bears memories instead of fruit. Soon, Maya suspects her life is in danger. Yet who, besides her husband, can she trust? With the fate of the human and Otherworldly realms hanging in the balance, Maya must unravel an ancient mystery that spans reincarnated lives to save those she loves the most…including herself.

 

bladeThe Poisoned Blade (Court of Fives #2) by Kate Elliott (My Review)

The Fives Court is treacherous.
The world outside is far worse.
Jessamy is moving up the ranks of the Fives–the complex athletic contest favored by the lowliest Commoners and the loftiest Patrons in her embattled kingdom. Pitted against far more formidable adversaries, success is Jes’s only option, as her prize money is essential to keeping her hidden family alive. She leaps at the change to tour the countryside and face more competitors, but then a fatal attack on her traveling party puts Jes at the center of the war that Lord Kalliarkos–the prince she still loves–is fighting against their country’s enemies. With a sinister overlord watching her every move and Kal’s life on the line, Jes must now become more than a Fives champion….She must become a warrior.

 

doorThe Door at the Crossroads by Zetta Elliott (RiC’s Book Discussion)

One summer night, Genna Colon makes a fateful wish that sends her and her boyfriend Judah spiraling

through time. They land hours apart in the city of Brooklyn—and in the middle of the Civil War. Genna is taken to the free Black community of Weeksville, but Judah suffers a harsher fate and is sent to the South as a slave. Judah miraculously makes his way back to Genna, but the New York City Draft Riots tear them apart once more. When Genna unexpectedly returns to her life in contemporary Brooklyn, she vows to fulfill the mandate of sankofa: “go back and fetch it.” But how will she summon the power she needs to open the door that leads back to Judah?

The Door at the Crossroads is the long-awaited sequel to A Wish After Midnight by award-winning author Zetta Elliott.

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Latinx Characters I Loved

Since there is still a few more days left in Hispanic Heritage Month, I thought I’d highlight some novels, or rather characters of said novels, that I absolutely loved. Some of these characters I’ve laughed with, cried with, cheered for them, and had my heart broken for/with them. I don’t think I even need to say that all these books are excellent and I highly recommend you give the creators of these wonderful characters some love.

livingShy Espinoza from The Living by Matt De La Pena’

I felt for Shy from page one as he tries to save the life of a passenger on the cruise ship he is working on who is determined to end his life. It’s one of those moments where the smallest interaction could end up changing someone’s life and Shy’s interaction with this man definietly changes his. And then the earthquake and tsumani just up-ends Shy’s life. Shy is the typical hero in this novel thrust into an adventure when he just wants to work to save some money. He is witty and smart and is willing to take risks and do what needs to be done to survive. He is also devoted to his family and his grief at knowing they could all potentially be dead is heartbreaking. I loved the action in “The Living”, but what really kept me reading was Shy.

americansMayor Toro & Maribel Rivera from The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristina Henriquez

Though Book of Unknown Americans is not technically a YA book, at the heart of the story is teenagers Mayor & Maribel and their love story. Both are children of immigrants who fall in love against their parent’s wishes. Maribel’s parents have brought her to America to see a doctor after a head injury changed her personality, and Mayor is just trying to survive living in his superstar brother’s shadow. Mayor & Maribel’s relationship is like a sweet, slow blooming flower as Mayor is able to reach Maribel in a way no one has since her accident. He is so sweet with her, seeing her for who she is now instead of who she was, that she feels more comfortable with him than anyone else and he helps her adjust to living in America. Book of Unknown Americans is a beautiful novel, but it’s Mayor & Maribel’s story that makes the story stay with you well after the last page.

gringolandiaDaniel Aguilar from Gringolandia by Lynn Miller-Lachmann

Where to begin with Daniel? He made me so angry yet I could feel for him at the same time. When Daniel was little, his father was taken from their home as a political prisoner in Chile. Years later, his father returns and now Daniel must learn how to live with his father again, just as his life is going great. Let’s just say the adjustment doesn’t go well and like a typical teenager, Daniel has some trouble accepting his father in his life. Daniel is a richly complex character that I would want to scream at because he was being such a teenager, but then felt his frustration at trying to get to know his father again, reconciling the memory of who his father was with the man that his father currently is. The growth that he undergoes as he begins to understand what his father went through and uses that knowledge to help build the relationship between him and his father warmed my heart. The Daniel at the end of the novel is a very different Daniel from the beginning and the journey with him is worth it.

gabiGabi Hernandez from Gabi, a Girl in Pieces by Isabel Quintero
I absolutely loved Gabi so much and wished she were actually one of my students. Gabi’s voice was so original and fresh and so funny that there were moments I actually laughed out loud. I read this novel after a very long, soul crushing day, but Gabi’s story lifted me up and was the perfect escape. She is is loyal to her friends, handles her tia perfectly, is accepting of herself (or rather comes to accept herself), and a wonderful poet to boot. She is the type of girl, if she were real, that once she got out of high school would rule the world with her awesomeness – in fact, she rules her world with her awesomeness. I feel like Gabi is a literary heroine that many young girls need and can be used as inspiration.

happyAaron Soto from More Happy Than Not by Adam Silvera
If Aaron’s story didn’t have you in tears at the end, then you must have a cold heart. Sounds mean, but truth. Aaron is such a fun, lovable, real kid that when the twist comes it’s a punch in the gut for both him and the reader. Aaron is the good kid in every neighborhood that is dependable, respectful to the elders, gets along with just about everyone, is the “cool” teenager but doesn’t forget to be young at heart. He is so thoughtful in his interactions with Genevieve and Thomas that you feel for him in his indecision between the two. Aaron, and by extension some of his friends, reminded me of my students who make me laugh but are the ones I know that sometimes need that extra push. Aaron touched my heart even before the twist so much that when I think about him and his story, my heart breaks every single time.

memoryVicky Cruz from The Memory of Light by Francisco X. Stork
Vicky is another character who I cried with as she fought through her depression and found life worth living after her suicide attempt. She is a quiet character, in that she observes the world in a unique way and was thoughtful in how she approached life after almost losing hers. She remains very open-minded just taking in what people say and then making her own conclusions after she has thought it all over.  It is through her experiences that she finds her how strength and is able to take charge of her life. Just like Gabi, I feel like Vicky is another literary heroine readers, specifically Latinx girls, need in their lives.

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Covers I Love 2.0

Over on our tumblr, we’ve been re-posting some of our older posts and one of mine, titled “Covers I Love” focused on beautiful book covers with characters of color. Since then, a number of books have out and I thought it would be fun to make a new list of beautiful covers!

pointe1. Pointe by Brandy Colette
One of the things I love about this cover is the colors. The sunset orange of the title mixed with the soft red of the lights throwing the heroine in shadow against the black is just moving. It creates an old world glamour feel with the white smoke at both the top and the bottom. It’s such a quiet cover that masks extremely well the intense story inside.

 

 

 

 

Killer_of_Enemies_FINALquote2. Killer of Enemies by Joseph Bruchac
I love this action shot here of the heroine of Bruchac’s dystopian novel. I feel like it captures the essence of the character well and I love that we have a Native American/Indian on the cover. I love the grey feel to the cover as the world that Lozen inhabits does feel like it’s lost all it’s luster and is very drab, while Lozen stands out as a bright spot, just as she does on the cover.

 

 

 

rebellion3. Rebellion by Karen Sandler
Is it any surprise that Tu Books has two books on my list? They clearly know how to do great covers and Oh My Goodness is this one a beauty. I fell in love with it the minute I saw it. I love the blues that give a sense of the cold world that Kayla finds herself in. I also think the model they chose is beautiful and the design of Kayla’s tattoo is beautiful which is a direct contrast of what it really stands for.

 

 

 

shadowshaper4. Shadowshaper by Daniel Jose Older
One of the many aspects of this cover that I love is Sierra’s hair. It is a gorgeous natural afro that is enhanced by all the colors of the world. Sierra is an artist, so the use of paint colors swirling around her head, and with her “don’t mess with me” face makes this the perfect representative of Sierra’s personality. And that is why this cover received so much love (and the novel too!)

 

 

 

whilewerun5. While We Run by Karen Healey
Just look at the intensity on these two character’s faces. What I love most about this cover is the juxtaposition of the skin tones of the two characters. It highlights the differences between the two, which is also at the crux of their relationship in the novel. If you look closely, the skin on both is cracked, like dried mud, and that further adds to the mood of the novel of these two characters trying make sense of trauma that has forever changed them and their quest to obtain ownership of their own lives.

 

 

boyinblacksuit6. Boy in the Black Suit by Jason Reynolds
I’m not exactly too sure what it is about this cover, it’s such a simple & straightforward cover, but it really moves me overtime I look at it. If I had to guess, I think it’s because it captures the essence of Matt perfectly. This is a young man who is thoughtful, as we can see by the turn of the model’s head and the way the hands are clasped together.  The cover also has a wrinkled quality to it which gives a sense of discomfort, which again, is a representative of the themes in this novel. Matt wears a fancy black suit everyday but is life is in shambles.

 

 

summerprince7. The Summer Prince by Alaya Dawn Johnson
One night, I had this book sitting underneath a lamp and I noticed that it practically glows. I don’t know what materials the cover designer used, but seriously, this cover is absolutely gorgeous. The gold of the tattoos on June’s arm, in contrast with the green just gives this ethereal, out of world experience, which is exactly what this book is. As one reads, the green does have meaning which makes this cover even more fantastical.

 

 

 

ypl_woodson_Brown_Girl_Dreaming8. Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson
Lastly, I had to include this cover because it is one of my favorite covers ever. I absolutely love the contrasts of blue against brown and this cover that gives us a gorgeous earth mixed with a gorgeous sky and a lone girl between them dreaming, her thoughts in the sky while feet are planted on earth, is everything. The sunlight behind the girl, just illuminating her slightly, adds to the focus on the dreams this young girl has.

 

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Book Festivals!!

It’s finally spring and that means the beginning of book festival season! If you are a lover of books, like I am, you are sure to be there ready to buy some books, attend panels about everything from writing stories to discussing obscure book topics, and geeking out about meeting your favorite authors. Here are some upcoming festivals. Which ones are you going to?

 

yallwest

April 30 – May 1st
Santa Monica High School
601 Pico Boulevard
http://www.yallwest.com/

HCBF_logo_cmyk

May 7th
215 Harry Howard Ave
Hudson, NY Website: http://www.hudsonchildrensbookfestival.com/

 

 

 

 

 

beaMay 11-13
McCormick Place
Chicago, IL
http://www.bookexpoamerica.com/

 

 

 

 

bookcon

 

May 14
McCormick Place,
Chicago, IL

https://www.thebookcon.com/

 

 

 

logo-lealaMay
Los Angeles Convention Center.
1201 S. Figueroa St
Los Angeles, CA
http://www.lea-la.com/

 

gaithersburg

May 21,
Gaithersburg City Hall
Gaithersburg, MD
www.gaithersburgbookfestival.org

 

 

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K. Imani’s Favorites for 2015

This was a great year for diverse books and I had a hard time coming up with a few books to list. Many of my favs were also on my fellow RiC contributor’s list. Just like Audrey, I loved “An Ember in the Ashes” and “The Weight of Feathers“. Crystal and I both loved “More Happy Than Not“, “Shadowshaper”, “The Boy in the Black Suit,” and “None of the Above.” So, here are my top favorites for 2015.

all am boysAll American Boys by Jason Reynolds & Brendan Kiely

My Review

In an unforgettable new novel from award-winning authors Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely, two teens—one black, one white—grapple with the repercussions of a single violent act that leaves their school, their community, and, ultimately, the country bitterly divided by racial tension.

A bag of chips. That’s all sixteen-year-old Rashad is looking for at the corner bodega. What he finds instead is a fist-happy cop, Paul Galuzzi, who mistakes Rashad for a shoplifter, mistakes Rashad’s pleadings that he’s stolen nothing for belligerence, mistakes Rashad’s resistance to leave the bodega as resisting arrest, mistakes Rashad’s every flinch at every punch the cop throws as further resistance and refusal to STAY STILL as ordered. But how can you stay still when someone is pounding your face into the concrete pavement?

But there were witnesses: Quinn Collins—a varsity basketball player and Rashad’s classmate who has been raised by Paul since his own father died in Afghanistan—and a video camera. Soon the beating is all over the news and Paul is getting threatened with accusations of prejudice and racial brutality. Quinn refuses to believe that the man who has basically been his savior could possibly be guilty. But then Rashad is absent. And absent again. And again. And the basketball team—half of whom are Rashad’s best friends—start to take sides. As does the school. And the town. Simmering tensions threaten to explode as Rashad and Quinn are forced to face decisions and consequences they had never considered before.

Written in tandem by two award-winning authors, this tour de force shares the alternating perspectives of Rashad and Quinn as the complications from that single violent moment, the type taken from the headlines, unfold and reverberate to highlight an unwelcome truth.

 

Love & DeathThe Game of Love and Death by Martha Brockenbrough 

My Review

Antony and Cleopatra. Helen of Troy and Paris. Romeo and Juliet. And now… Henry and Flora.

For centuries Love and Death have chosen their players. They have set the rules, rolled the dice, and kept close, ready to influence, angling for supremacy. And Death has always won. Always.

Could there ever be one time, one place, one pair whose love would truly tip the balance?

Meet Flora Saudade, an African-American girl who dreams of becoming the next Amelia Earhart by day and sings in the smoky jazz clubs of Seattle by night. Meet Henry Bishop, born a few blocks and a million worlds away, a white boy with his future assured—a wealthy adoptive family in the midst of the Great Depression, a college scholarship, and all the opportunities in the world seemingly available to him.

The players have been chosen. The dice have been rolled. But when human beings make moves of their own, what happens next is anyone’s guess.

 

tinyTiny Pretty Things by Sona Charaipotra and Dhonielle Clayton 

My Review

Black Swan meets Pretty Little Liars in this soapy, drama-packed novel featuring diverse characters who will do anything to be the prima at their elite ballet school.

Gigi, Bette, and June, three top students at an exclusive Manhattan ballet school, have seen their fair share of drama. Free-spirited new girl Gigi just wants to dance—but the very act might kill her. Privileged New Yorker Bette’s desire to escape the shadow of her ballet star sister brings out a dangerous edge in her. And perfectionist June needs to land a lead role this year or her controlling mother will put an end to her dancing dreams forever. When every dancer is both friend and foe, the girls will sacrifice, manipulate, and backstab to be the best of the best.

 

holesMy Heart and Other Black Holes by Jasmine Warga

My Review

Sixteen-year-old physics nerd Aysel is obsessed with plotting her own death. With a mother who can barely look at her without wincing, classmates who whisper behind her back, and a father whose violent crime rocked her small town, Aysel is ready to turn her potential energy into nothingness.

There’s only one problem: she’s not sure she has the courage to do it alone. But once she discovers a website with a section called Suicide Partners, Aysel’s convinced she’s found her solution: a teen boy with the username FrozenRobot (aka Roman) who’s haunted by a family tragedy is looking for a partner.

Even though Aysel and Roman have nothing in common, they slowly start to fill in each other’s broken lives. But as their suicide pact becomes more concrete, Aysel begins to question whether she really wants to go through with it. Ultimately, she must choose between wanting to die or trying to convince Roman to live so they can discover the potential of their energy together. Except that Roman may not be so easy to convince.

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