New Releases

Three books are coming out this Tuesday, October 11th… including the much anticipated final book of The Young Elites series!

starThe Midnight Star (The Young Elites #3) by Marie Lu
There was once a time when darkness shrouded the world, and the darkness had a queen. Adelina Amouteru is done suffering. She’s turned her back on those who have betrayed her and achieved the ultimate revenge: victory. Her reign as the White Wolf has been a triumphant one, but with each conquest her cruelty only grows. The darkness within her has begun to spiral out of control, threatening to destroy all that she’s achieved.

Adelina’s forced to revisit old wounds when a new danger appears, putting not only Adelina at risk, but every Elite and the very world they live in. In order to save herself and preserve her empire, Adelina and her Roses must join the Daggers on a perilous quest—though this uneasy alliance may prove to be the real danger. [Image and summary via Goodreads]

ironIron Cast by Destiny Soria
It’s Boston, 1919, and the Cast Iron club is packed. On stage, hemopaths—whose “afflicted” blood gives them the ability to create illusions through art—captivate their audience. Corinne and Ada have been best friends ever since infamous gangster Johnny Dervish recruited them into his circle. By night they perform for Johnny’s crowds, and by day they con Boston’s elite. When a job goes wrong and Ada is imprisoned, they realize how precarious their position is. After she escapes, two of the Cast Iron’s hires are shot, and Johnny disappears. With the law closing in, Corinne and Ada are forced to hunt for answers, even as betrayal faces them at every turn. [Image and summary via Goodreads]

raniRani Patel in Full Effect by Sonia Patel
When Rani’s father leaves her mother for another woman, Rani shaves her head in mourning. This act of rebellion propels her onto the stage as a hip-hop performer and into a romantic relationship with an older man. Losing herself just as she finds herself, Rani discovers her need to speak out against those who would silence her—no matter the danger. [Image and summary via Goodreads]

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Review: Not Your Sidekick

29904219Title:  Not Your Sidekick
Author: C.B. Lee
Genres: Science Fiction
Pages: 262
Publisher: Duet Books
Availability: September 8th, 2016

Summary: Welcome to Andover… where superpowers are common, but internships are complicated. Just ask high school nobody, Jessica Tran. Despite her heroic lineage, Jess is resigned to a life without superpowers and is merely looking to beef-up her college applications when she stumbles upon the perfect (paid!) internship—only it turns out to be for the town’s most heinous supervillain. On the upside, she gets to work with her longtime secret crush, Abby, who Jess thinks may have a secret of her own. Then there’s the budding attraction to her fellow intern, the mysterious “M,” who never seems to be in the same place as Abby. But what starts as a fun way to spite her superhero parents takes a sudden and dangerous turn when she uncovers a plot larger than heroes and villains altogether. [Image and summary via Goodreads]

Review: The moment I heard about Not Your Sidekick, I bought it — and waited. I waited for months (months!) until its release date, and then happily read the whole thing in one go, as one does when there’s work tomorrow but consequences and sleep debt are for other people. The moment my brain registered “superhero intern” and “that’s an Asian girl!” all those months ago, I knew I had to get the book.

In the world of Not Your Sidekick, Jessica Tran is the daughter of two small town superheroes. In an all too relatable twist, Jess struggles to figure out who she is as a powerless daughter of superpowered parents and ends up in the first paid internship she trips upon. Her internship is for the supervillains who regularly keep her parents busy with their criminal doings. Conspiracies and crushes continue from there.

The mix of superhero intrigue and adorable blossoming romance was just perfect. I shipped Jess and Abby — and, well, you’ll just have to read the rest. Basically, the adorable romance was my favorite thing about the book. A close second was the set-up and worldbuilding of a superhero populated future world not too different from our current one. I would love to read more in this world, and fortunately, the ending left plenty of room for a sequel.

There are quite a few LGBTQIA young adult novels coming out this fall. Of that number, a tiny but awesome fraction center around/are written by PoC. This is one of those books, and I was happy to discover that it lived up to, and exceeded, my expectations.

Catch this book, for sure. It’s got Asian and LGBTQIA representation, superheroes, and the struggles of a first internship. What’s not to love?

Recommendation: Buy it now! Especially if superhero YA is your thing.

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September Reading List

There’s plenty of amazing books coming out this fall, but I’m still playing catch-up on my to-read list (whoops). I’ve got new summer books and other books that honestly I should’ve read ages ago. Here are my top three right now:

Not Your SidekickNot Your Sidekick by C.B. Lee
Welcome to Andover… where superpowers are common, but internships are complicated. Just ask high school nobody, Jessica Tran. Despite her heroic lineage, Jess is resigned to a life without superpowers and is merely looking to beef-up her college applications when she stumbles upon the perfect (paid!) internship—only it turns out to be for the town’s most heinous supervillain. On the upside, she gets to work with her longtime secret crush, Abby, who Jess thinks may have a secret of her own. Then there’s the budding attraction to her fellow intern, the mysterious “M,” who never seems to be in the same place as Abby. But what starts as a fun way to spite her superhero parents takes a sudden and dangerous turn when she uncovers a plot larger than heroes and villains altogether. [Image and summary via Goodreads]

torchA Torch Against the Night (An Ember in the Ashes #2) by Sabaa Tahir
A Torch Against the Night takes readers into the heart of the Empire as Laia and Elias fight their way north to liberate Laia’s brother from the horrors of Kauf Prison. Hunted by Empire soldiers, manipulated by the Commandant, and haunted by their pasts, Laia and Elias must outfox their enemies and confront the treacherousness of their own hearts.

In the city of Serra, Helene Aquilla finds herself bound to the will of the Empire’s twisted new leader, Marcus. When her loyalty is questioned, Helene finds herself taking on a mission to prove herself—a mission that might destroy her, instead. [Image and summary via Goodreads]

moonOutrun the Moon by Stacey Lee
San Francisco, 1906: Fifteen-year-old Mercy Wong is determined to break from the poverty in Chinatown, and an education at St. Clare’s School for Girls is her best hope. Although St. Clare’s is off-limits to all but the wealthiest white girls, Mercy gains admittance through a mix of cunning and a little bribery, only to discover that getting in was the easiest part. Not to be undone by a bunch of spoiled heiresses, Mercy stands strong—until disaster strikes.

On April 18, a historic earthquake rocks San Francisco, destroying Mercy’s home and school. With martial law in effect, she is forced to wait with her classmates for their families in a temporary park encampment. Though fires might rage, and the city may be in shambles, Mercy can’t sit by while they wait for the army to bring help—she still has the “bossy” cheeks that mark her as someone who gets things done. But what can one teenage girl do to heal so many suffering in her broken city? [Image and summary via Goodreads]

What’s on your to-read list?

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New Releases

Happy early book birthday to three new releases out this Tuesday 9/13, and Shame the Stars out on Thursday 9/15! Are any of these on your to-read list?

pasadena
Pasadena by Serri L. Smith
G.P. Putnam’s Sons Books for Young Readers

Bad things happen everywhere. Even in the land of sun and roses.

When Jude’s best friend is found dead in a swimming pool, her family calls it an accident. Her friends call it suicide. But Jude calls it what it is: murder. And someone has to pay.

Now everyone is a suspect–family and friends alike. And Jude is digging up the past like bones from a shallow grave. Anything to get closer to the truth. But that’s the thing about secrets. Once they start turning up, nothing is sacred. And Jude’s got a few skeletons of her own.

readerThe Reader (Sea of Ink and Gold #1) by Traci Chee
Sefia knows what it means to survive. After her father is brutally murdered, she flees into the wilderness with her aunt Nin, who teaches her to hunt, track, and steal. But when Nin is kidnapped, leaving Sefia completely alone, none of her survival skills can help her discover where Nin’s been taken, or if she’s even alive. The only clue to both her aunt’s disappearance and her father’s murder is the odd rectangular object her father left behind, an object she comes to realize is a book—a marvelous item unheard of in her otherwise illiterate society. With the help of this book, and the aid of a mysterious stranger with dark secrets of his own, Sefia sets out to rescue her aunt and find out what really happened the day her father was killed—and punish the people responsible. [Image and summary via Goodreads]

geekGoing Geek by Charlotte Huang
A girl forced out of her comfort zone finds that being true to herself is the best way to live her life, in this second novel from the author of For the Record.

It wasn’t supposed to be this way. Skylar Hoffman’s senior year at her preppy East Coast boarding school should have been perfect:
amazing boyfriend
the coolest friends
the most desirable dorm
But it’s far from it. To her dismay, Skylar’s not going to rule senior year because she’s stuck in Abbot House, a tiny dorm known for, well, nothing. Living with a group of strangers everyone thinks is lame is bad enough. Worse is that Skylar wasn’t exactly truthful about how she spent summer break in Los Angeles—and her little white lie is causing her once rock-solid romance to crumble fast. And when it turns out that Skylar’s best friend is the one responsible for having her booted from Lincoln? It’s an all-out war. [Image and summary via Goodreads]

Shame the StarsShame the Stars by Guadalupe Garcia McCall
A YA re-imagining of Romeo and Juliet set in 1915 Texas during the height of the Mexican revolution, about Joaquin, a Mexican-American teen trying to protect his family’s ranch and his sweetheart, Dulcena, from the Texas Rangers and their posses. [Image and summary via Goodreads]

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Review: The Shadow Hour

the shadow hourTitle: The Shadow Hour
Author: Melissa Grey
Genres: Fantasy
Pages: 432
Publisher: Delacorte Press
Review copy: Library
Availability: July 12th, 2016

Summary: A battle has been won. But the war has only just begun. Everything in Echo’s life changed in a blinding flash when she learned the startling truth: she is the firebird, the creature of light that is said to bring peace.The firebird has come into the world, but it has not come alone. Every action has an equal and opposite reaction, and Echo can feel a great and terrible darkness rising in the distance. Cosmic forces threaten to tear the world apart.

Echo has already lost her home, her family, and her boyfriend. Now, as the firebird, her path is filled with even greater dangers than the ones she’s already overcome.She knows the Dragon Prince will not fall without a fight.Echo must decide: can she wield the power of her true nature—or will it prove too strong for her, and burn what’s left of her world to the ground?

Welcome to the shadow hour. [Image and summary via Goodreads]

Review: As the sequel to The Girl At Midnight, Melissa Grey’s The Shadow Hour definitely doesn’t function as a standalone. And why would you want it to? The Girl at Midnight is a fun urban fantasy read. Once you’ve read (or, in my case, gobbled up in two hours) that, then you’re good to go.

The Shadow Hour continues in the aftermath of The Girl at Midnight after Echo (spoiler alert!) becomes the Firebird. Echo’s motley crew of enemies-turned-allies are hiding out, keeping especially Echo from the rest of the world. But Echo’s new status as the chosen one has consequences. Eventually, a new threat forces the group out of hiding and brings Echo back into the action to defend her feathered avicen people.

Like with the first book in the series, The Shadow Hour has daring exploits and heists a-plenty. The fast-paced globe-trotting adventures mingle with interludes of romance and slice-of-life moments. Cold-hearted as I am, I did feel that some of the heavy emotional moments went on for a little too long, but other people may enjoy that.

If you liked The Girl at Midnight, you definitely should read its sequel. And if you haven’t tried out the first book in the series, that should be on your to-do list. Anyone fond of libraries, magical beings, and solid urban fantasy would love this series. I’m looking forward to the final book in the trilogy!

Recommendation: Get it soon!

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Diversity Conversations on Twitter

It’s been over two years since #WeNeedDiverseBooks happened, and a lot has changed since then. There’s greater awareness of the issue of diversity in fiction. Mentorship programs, fiction contests, publishing surveys, and thinkpieces have sprung up since then.

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At the same time, the same old problems persist. Publishing still largely centers the privileged. Cultural appropriation and stereotyping abound in fiction. Book reviews are rife with biases. The list goes on. Fortunately, so does the conversation. Quite a few more hashtags have been kicked off on Twitter since #WeNeedDiverseBooks, all contributing to the larger questions of – What next? How can things change for the better? How do we support creators of color and creators from other marginalized groups so that they can better tell their stories?

Here are a few of the big ones:

#WeNeedDiverseBooks started in May 2014, check out the team behind the hashtag here: weneeddiversebooks.org/

And read Audrey’s reflections on it here: http://richincolor.com/2014/05/a-few-thoughts-on-weneeddiversebooks/

#OwnVoices started by Corinne Duyvis (@corinneduyvis), meant “to recommend kidlit about diverse characters written by authors from that same diverse group.” Read more about it here: http://www.yainterrobang.com/ownvoices/

#DiverseBookBloggers started by Nazahet Hernandez (@_diversebooks) to help foster the diverse book blogger community, read more about it here: http://readdiversebooks.com/a-call-to-all-diversebookbloggers/

#OwnYourOwn started by Kaye M. (@gildedspine) to encourage marginalized voices, read more about it here: http://www.yainterrobang.com/ownyourown/

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